Janice Lin Is an Advocate For the Sun and Wind

The Berkeley consultant helps companies, utilities, and governments move toward greater use of alternative energy.


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Lin was a leader in conceptualizing Assembly Bill 2514, which was designed to encourage California to incorporate energy storage into the electricity grid. Lin brought the concept to former Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner, who carried the bill forward.

“I raised to Janice ‘that look’,” Skinner said. “It took me a while to understand the benefits of energy storage. But she was patient, and as soon as I got it, it was an A-ha light bulb moment.”

Skinner asked Lin to assemble a group of business-oriented people interested in energy storage who could help get proposals into legislation. So Lin put together the California Energy Storage Alliance, an advocacy group that includes technology manufacturers and project developers. The alliance holds events such as the annual Market Development Forum, in which policymakers and alliance members come together to brainstorm solutions and forge partnerships.

“There are now over 80 companies that have been founded and started in California, and those companies would not have had a market without CESA and Janice’s work,” said Stacey Reineccius, who has worked with Lin since she started the alliance in 2009. “It just would not have been possible without the organization she put together.”

Her colleagues share the sentiment that Lin is uniquely talented at generating a diversity of viewpoints, with an understanding not only the technology of the industry, but also the policy. In fact, Strategen has built relationships around the globe.

“As we pull in energy storage, what we can do now is match our loads to that generation,” said Joe Heinzmann of GE Renewable Energy. “She’s been able to recognize that and advocate that, always in a professional manner, in public and group meetings. She’s able to tie all these pieces together into a value proposition, into energy storage.”

Lin is constantly looking for new ways to make a wider impact by reaching those who may not know about alternative energy. Toward that end, she spent months producing an extensive online video summarizing the electric power industry and its power to transform communities.

Running her own company has allowed her to be more flexible with her time, Lin said. So she tries to schedule weekly yoga sessions with friends she has known since her days at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

One of those friends, Dollaya DePasquale, said that Lin’s nature extends to many walks of life. “She’s very passionate about her beliefs, but also very open to other people’s interests,” DePasquale said. “A very selfless person.”

Lin believes that the leadership role she plays in her professional life also helps her outside of work. She’s able to spend time with her two children, which is very important for her.

“It’s my dream job,” she said. “I get to do fun work with great people, and also get to pick my kids up and have dinner with them every day. I think by going out on your own, it’s possible to make it all work.”

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