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Other Food & Drink

The Craft-Beer Scene Explodes

The East Bay has always been a haven for beer lovers, whether they’re sipping pints from the source at Linden Street Brewery in Jack London Square, checking out the facilities at Drake’s Brewery in San Leandro, or exploring the selections at The Trappist and Beer Revolution. But those are just drops in the pint glass compared to the torrent of new craft-beer purveyors that have begun to arrive since early fall.

Big, Bold Burgers

Umami Burger, after taking over Los Angeles, strategically began to expand the empire. San Francisco and New York were musts. But Oakland?

Shrub-a-Dub-Dub

Ask bar manager Jay Crabb at Berkeley’s BUILD Pizzeria what’s in his off-menu cocktail the Amalfi Coast, and he’ll say: St. George Botanivore gin, Aperol, Barolo Chinato, lemon juice, and house-made grapefruit shrub.

Fresh Take on Classic Japanese Snacks

Onigiri are a traditional Japanese snack—a handful of rice encases a savory filling, with a seaweed wrapping for easy transport. They’re common, at least in Japan, where every convenience store sells them. But onigiri made from almost exclusively local ingredients? That’s what makes Oakland catering business Peko-Peko’s onigiri unique.

En Garde, Zachary’s!

To the casual observer, the sudden arrival of Pennsylvania upstart Jules Thin Crust on College Avenue earlier this year—directly across the street from Zachary’s, the East Bay’s longtime deep dish purveyor—may have seemed like the opening salvo in an all-out war for the hearts and minds of Rockridge pizza connoisseurs. But according to co-owner Heather Clapp, its presence is not intended as a bold challenge to the kingdom of Zach’s.

Eating Alameda

Park Street, Alameda’s main drag, has a remarkably high concentration of ethnic food options: four Japanese restaurants, three Thai restaurants, two Mexican, and, well, you get the idea. Besides just offering a plethora of dining choices for adventurous foodies, perhaps the best part about having all these great options within a few-block radius is that the food is often as affordable as it is delicious. Here’s our guide to Alameda’s ethnic eats from $1 through $10.

Gluten-free Gourmet

Love fried chicken? How about lick-your-fingers-clean barbecue ribs? If you were nodding your head (and no doubt you were), then you may want to take a seat at Grease Box, a tiny cafe on Stanford Street that serves up homemade Southern favorites, including buttery breads, crispy potpies, and fork-tender brisket.

Ask the Chef

Yingji Huang, the chef-owner of Kakui Sushi in Montclair was born in China, he didn’t grow up with sushi culture and didn’t even sample sashimi until high school.

Memory Lane

Dr. Paul Anders practiced dentistry on Santa Clara Avenue for 47 years.