Edit ModuleShow Tags

Arts & Culture

Mati Rose McDonough Has a New Release

Oaklander Mati Rose McDonough uses her whimsical painting style in a new children's book, which will be released March 25, 2014.

Three new books: Afro-Vegan, Explosion Green, and Glitter and Glue

Three new books on cooking, building, and growing up.

Echoes of 52nd Street at the 57th Street Gallery

As a young woman approaches the bandstand at the back of Oakland’s 57th Street Gallery, a veritable pantheon of jazz and R&B legends gazes down upon her. Among the immortals captured on canvas are a pensively staring Duke Ellington, a coiled Miles Davis with his horn raised mid-note, and a smoldering young Etta James who gazes impassively while Ila Cantor settles herself on a barstool with her guitar, confers with the quartet on stage, and launches into a briskly swinging version of Jimmy Van Heusen’s “Like Someone In Love.”

Free Little Libraries take off in the East Bay.

neighborhood was friendly, but full of so many different kinds of people—young students, working adults, retirees—that she sometimes felt there wasn’t much that united them as a community. So she built a library in her front yard.

Novelist Anthony Marra celebrates humanity in war-torn Chechnya.

Oakland novelist Anthony Marra celebrates humanity in war-torn Chechnya and counts his blessings.

Chandra Cerrito Contemporary appeals to the masses.

Chandra Cerrito was curating a virtual gallery called Contemporary Quarterly when, in 2007, Mercury 20 Gallery founder Robert Tomlinson suggested she open her own gallery on his mezzanine. With a BA in art history from Princeton, an MFA from California College of the Arts, and more than a decade of experience as gallery manager and art consultant at Andrea Schwartz Gallery in San Francisco, she thought, “why not?” Then in 2010 the former home of Esteban Sabar Gallery and Fort Gallery at 480 23rd St., Oakland, became available. Cerrito picked up the lease and split that labyrinthine venue into Chandra Cerrito Contemporary and Krowswork Gallery, to whom she sublets.

The return of Tony! Toni! Toné!

What to do and when to do it.

New Books on Jack London, Alameda Artists, and Southeast Asia Travel

New books of interest to Bay Area readers.

East Bay Children’s Book Project puts books into kids’ hands.

Oh, the places you’ll go!” Dr. Seuss famously said, and his admiring exclamation certainly applies to the East Bay Children’s Book Project, started in 2005 by a few retired teachers who wanted to give books to kids with little or no access to the written word. Little did the tiny band of literacy warriors know that less than a decade later, the books distributed would number almost a million—and counting.

Alameda’s First Husband Rod Gilmore finally gets a chance to talk football.

Oakland-bred Alameda attorney Rod Gilmore doesn’t get to talk football with his fellow Islanders much. That’s because his wife, Marie, is the mayor, and locals would rather yak it up with her about stuff like the latest graffiti abatement strategy. Sheesh. If they only knew about Gilmore’s other gig as a high-octane ESPN college football analyst. In the spirit of conversational fairness, I called out the former early ’80s Stanford defensive back recently so he could vent—about college football that is.