Out on the Town



Fired up for the Fire Arts

     The Crucible’s 9th Annual Fire Arts Festival on July 15–18 gets a new venue—Wake Avenue and Engineer Road on the old Oakland Army Base—this summer, but the awe will likely be the same, or better. You’ll be dwarfed by gigantic sculptures, get hands-on with interactive installations and experience an eye-popping array of cutting-edge fire sculpture and art. Advance tickets $35–$50. There is a $5 discount for Crucible members; add $50 for the Patron Pavilion Pass. More info at (510) 444-0919 or visit www.thecrucible.org.

JULY

July 1  •  Summer Sounds. The band Mo Rockin’ brings its world music to Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

July 4  •  Jack London Square Fourth of July. The fireworks begin at 9:15 p.m. and go on for about 20 minutes. But that’s just the capper. Five hours of music entertainment precede the pyrotechnics, along with a myriad of children’s entertainment. There is good barbecue to be had on the square, along with plenty of arts and crafts vendors.
Everything starts at 7 p.m.
FREE

July 4  • The Alameda Mayor’s Fourth of July Parade. Alameda might have one of the corniest, goofiest and most charming Independence Day celebrations anywhere. That is a good thing. The Alameda Mayor’s Fourth of July Parade begins at 9:45 a.m., but many of the expected crowd of 20,000 (!) will be on hand early so as not to miss the 170 or so floats that navigate the 3.3-mile route, along with the numerous marching bands, dancers, clowns and what have you.
More info at www.myalamedaparade.com.
FREE

July 4  •  Independence Day on the USS Hornet. Visit the aircraft carrier for a family-oriented patriotic holiday. Tour the ship, play carnival games, ride a flight simulator or listen to Eddie & The Boppers and others.
10 a.m.–10 p.m. $25 adults ($22 advance), $10 children (some discounts available). (510) 521-8448, www.hornetevents.com, or www.uss-hornet.org.

July 6–10  •  Mosaic Camp. The Institute of Mosaic Art offers a “Mosaic Summer Camp For Adults” in Jingletown. This is a beginners’ workshop. Fee is $625, plus $30–$50 for materials. Discussions on contemporary and historical mosaic topics, guest teachers and/or lecturers, videos presentations and field trips to local mosaic sites are included.
3001 Chapman St., Oakland, (510) 437-9899, www.instituteofmosaicart.com.

July 8  •  Summer Sounds. The band Future Perfect brings its R&B/soul music to Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway,(510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

July 8–Aug. 2  •  Private Lives. Cal Shakes associate artist Mark Drucker directs Noël Coward’s mischievous romantic comedy about a pair of exes bunking next to each other in hotel honeymoon suites. Times vary. Tickets $40–$63 (some discounts available).
California Shakespeare Theater, Bruns Amphitheater, 100 Gateway Blvd., Orinda, (510) 548-3422, www.calshakes.org.

July 9  •  Rise Against. With Rancid and Billy Talent. Parking opens at 5:30, doors at 6:30, show at 7:30.
Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way, (510) 569-2121. Info for tickets, parking, etc., at www.coliseum.com/events.

July 10–12, 16–19  •  Peter Pan. Woodminster Summer Musicals stages the version based on the play by Sir James M. Barrie. Music by Moose Charlap. Lyrics by Carolyn Leigh. This musical opened on Broadway in 1954 and was first produced for television by NBC in 1955.
8 p.m. $25–$40 ($2 discount for children/seniors). Woodminster Amphitheater, Joaquin Miller Park, 3300 Joaquin Miller Road, Oakland, (510) 531-9597, www.woodminster.com.

July 10, 17–19, 23-26, 30-31  •  Peter Pan: The Musical. The Berkeley Playhouse presents Peter Pan, Tinkerbell, Hook, Tiger Lily, Wendy and the other familiar characters. Directed by founding artistic director Elizabeth McKoy. Times vary.
$18–$25. Ashby Stage, 1901 Ashby Ave., Berkeley, (510) 841-6500, www.shotgunplayers.org.

July 10–Aug. 16  •  The Spitfire Grill. The Altarena Playhouse brings the Off-Broadway musical to life with Fred Chacon directing the story of a female ex-con picking up the pieces of her life.
8 p.m. Fri., Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. $17–$20. Altarena Playhouse, 1409 High St., Alameda, (510) 764-9718, www.altarena.org.

10  •  Beyoncé.
The diva of soul takes the arena stage in this highly anticipated performance.
Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way, (510) 569-2121. Info for tickets, parking, etc., at www.coliseum.com/events.

10  •  Concerts at the Cove.
Notorious heads the bill at this outdoor concert put on by the West Alameda Business District and the East Bay Regional Park District.
5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m. Crab Cove, Robert Crown Memorial State Beach, foot of McKay Street, Alameda, (510) 523-5955, www.westalamedabusiness.com.
FREE

11–Aug. 16  •  The Taming of the Shrew. Woman’s Will, the Oakland-based all-woman, multi-ethnic Shakespeare troupe, takes the Bard’s tale of Petruchio and Katherina’s courtship outside to Bay Area parks.
Visit www.womanswill.org for venue details or call (510) 420-0813.

July 11  •  Feast of the Beasts. Pretend you’re a zookeeper and help feed the elephants at the Oakland Zoo. Bring lettuce, carrots, apples and the like for the hungry herd.
9 a.m. Regular admission. 9777 Golf Links Road, (510) 632-9525, www.oaklandzoo.org.

July 11-12  •  Scottish Highland Games. Toss a caber, wear a kilt, do a jig or just listen to the bagpipes at this 35th annual event at Dunsmuir Estate that celebrates all things Scottish.
10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5–$12. 2960 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, (510) 562-0328, www.dunsmuir.org.

July 11, 12, 18, 19, 24–26  •  Ragtime. The Alameda Civic Light Opera gives E.L. Doctorow’s colorful characters new life in a PG-rated musical exploring the fascinating and turbulent American melting pot of the early 20th century.
 2 p.m., 8 p.m. $30–$34. Kofman Auditorium, 2200 Central Ave., Alameda, (510) 864.2256, www.aclo.com.

July 12  •  Alameda Meals on Wheels Community Faire and Wine Tasting Fundraiser. Support MOW by attending this popular wine-tasting event at Rosenblum Cellars where local restaurateurs and vintners share their bounty.
1 p.m. Donation requested. Rosenblum Cellars, 2900 Main St., Alameda, (510) 865-7007, www.alamedamealsonwheels.org.

July 15  •  Summer Sounds. The band Fito Reinoso brings Cuban music to Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

July 17–19  •  Annie Jr. Annie, Sandy, Daddy Warbucks and the gang hold court in Alameda for this Alameda Kids Take the Stage all-kids production.
2 p.m., 7 p.m. $8–$12. Alameda Little Theater, 2200 Central Ave., (800) 997-6544, www.kidstakethestage.com.

July 19, Aug. 16  •  Oakland on Two Wheels. Learn history and get some exercise around downtown with bike-tripping docents from the Oakland Museum of California. Bring your own bikes, helmets and repair kits.
10 a.m. (reservations recommended: docentcenter@museumca.org, 510-238-3514, meet at 10th Street entrance). 1000 Oak St., (510) 238-2200, www.museumca.org.
FREE

July 22  •  Summer Sounds. The band Sonic Strut brings its R&B/Motown music to Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

July 24–26  •  Splashdown 2009. A weekend celebrating the Apollo 11 40th Anniversary. On July 25, Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, will be onboard to deliver a speech, as well as to sign copies of his new book, Magnificent Desolation: The Long Road Home from the Moon.
707 W. Hornet Ave., Alameda, (510) 521-8448, www.uss-hornet.org.

July 24–26  •  Beauty and the Beast. The fairy tale of true love between a hideous beast and lovely maiden is the subject of this Alameda Kids Takes the
Stage show on the Mills College Campus.
2 p.m. or 7 p.m. $8–$12. Lisser Theater, 5000 MacArthur Blvd., Oakland, (800) 997-6544, www.kidstakethestage.com.

July 25-26  •  Park Street Art & Wine Faire. Alameda’s biggest street party of the year enters its 25th year of serving up wholesome family fun. Food, wine,
beer, mimosas, arts, crafts, two music stages, kids’ stuff, a petting zoo, ponies, free trolley rides—it’s all here.
10 a.m.–6 p.m. Park Street, (510) 523-1392, www.shopparkstreet.com.
FREE

July 25-26  •  Rosenblum Cellars Annual Summer Open House. Calling all Zinfandel lovers: Celebrate the fruit of the vine and summer at Rosenblum Cellars’ seasonal bash. Wine club members can experience exclusive previews; the masses can sip new releases and sample delicious hors d’oeuvres.
1 p.m.–5 p.m. $25–$45. 2900 Main St., Alameda, (510) 865-7007, www.rosenblumcellars.com.

July 29  •  Summer Sounds. Harry Clement brings zydeco and blues to Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

July 30  •  Alameda Museum Lecture Series. Art historian Colette Colester lectures on “Winslow Homer and the Post Civil War Era in America.”
7 p.m. Free for museum members, $5 others. Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Ave., Alameda, (510) 748.0796, www.alamedamuseum.org.

July 31  • Earth, Wind & Fire at The Greek Catch hot acts all summer—Death Cab for Cutie (July 11), Counting Crows (July 26) and Earth, Wind & Fire (July 31)—at The Greek, one of Berkeley’s best venues.
William Randolph Hearst Greek Theatre, UC Berkeley, Hearst and Gayley, (510) 809-0100, www.apeconcerts.com

AUGUST

Aug 1-2  •  Lakefest ’09. Party on Lakeshore Avenue at this second annual festival full of arts and crafts, wine tasting, music, food and kids’ events. Oh, and shop Lakeshore Avenue merchants, too.
10 a.m.–5 p.m. Lake Park Avenue to Mandana Boulevard, Oakland, www.oaklandlakefest.com.
FREE

Aug 2  •  12th Annual Bay to Barkers Dog Walk & Festival. See pooches on parade at this annual dog fest that includes a 1-mile walk, arts and crafts activities and doggie demos and contests. The event moves this year to the north parking lot of Golden Gate Fields in Albany.
10 a.m.–1 p.m. (8:30 a.m. registration). For more info, (510) 845-7735, Ext. 10, www.berkeleyhumane.org.

Aug 2  •  Sonic Youth at the Fox. The Fox Theater adds architectural finery—and some of the best names in music, thanks to promotion by Berkeley-based Another Planet Entertainment—to a red-hot Uptown scene: Of Montreal (July 24), Lebowski Fest (July 25), Sonic Youth (Aug. 2), Underworld (Aug. 7).
Prices vary. Fox Theater, 1807 Telegraph Ave., (800) 745-3000, theoaklandfox.com, apeconcerts.com, ticketmaster.com.

Aug 5  •  Summer Sounds. The band Native Elements treats the noontime crowd to reggae as part of Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

Aug 7–9, 13–16  •  Singin’ in the Rain. Woodminster Summer Musicals puts on the musical based on the 1952 MGM film with music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed and screenplay and stage adaptation by Betty Comden and Adolph Green.
8 p.m. $25–$40 ($2 discount for children/seniors). Woodminster Amphitheater, Oakland’s Joaquin Miller Park, 3300 Joaquin Miller Road, (510) 531-9597, www.woodminster.com.

Aug 8-9, 15-16, 21–23  •  Annie. The rags-to-riches story is the Alameda Civic Light Opera’s second production of the year—and a G-rated one at that—in its so-called Season of Change.
2 p.m., 8 p.m. $30–$34. Kofman Auditorium, 2200 Central Ave., Alameda, (510) 864.2256, www.aclo.com.

12–Sept. 6  •  Happy Days. Cal Shakes brings Oscar-nominated actress Marsha Mason to Orinda for Samuel Beckett’s “happy” play about Winnie, a woman buried in sand; her husband, Willie, and an ant. Artistic director Jonathan Moscone directs.
Times vary. Tickets $40–$63 (some discounts available). California Shakespeare Theater, Bruns Amphitheater, 100 Gateway Blvd., Orinda, (510) 548-3422, www.calshakes.org.

Aug 12  •  Summer Sounds. The band Stung, a Police tribute band (get it?), trots out the old favorites at Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.

Aug 12-16 Ringling Bros. And Barnum & Bailey Circus. Old-school circus still has a place in the imagination, as this multiple-day run proves
7:30 p.m. on the 12th, 13th and 14th; 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on the 15th; 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. on the 16th. Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way, (510) 569-2121. Info for tickets, parking, etc., at www.coliseum.com/events.

Aug 13  •  Raiders Exhibition Opener. The Dallas Cowboys help the Silver and Black open their preseason.
Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, (510) 569-2121, www.raiders.com.

Aug 14  •  Concerts at the Cove. Finish out the series with Caitlin and Will. The concerts are organized by the West Alameda Business District and the East Bay Regional Park District.
5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m. Crab Cove, Robert Crown Memorial State Beach, foot of McKay Street, Alameda, (510) 523-5955, www.westalamedabusiness.com.

Aug 15-16   •  Art & Soul. Oakland’s traditional downtown Labor Day music-cultural fest of tunes, art, dance, music, food and fun gets a new date at City Center, because of the Bay Bridge retrofitting closure.
$10 adults, $5 seniors and youth 13–17, free for 12 and under. Details unavailable at press time, so for headliner info and a complete schedule, check www.artandsouloakland.com.

Aug 19  •  Jackson Browne. The so-called “thinking man’s rock star” gets a star turn at a star venue. Tickets $39.50-$59.50. Doors open one hour before showtime.
Paramount Theatre, 2025 Broadway, Oakland, (510)-893-2300, www.paramounttheatre.com.

Aug 19  •  Summer Sounds. The band Bayonics performs its Latin/Funk music as part of Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

Aug 21–Sept. 27  •  Awake and Sing! Aurora Theatre opens the 2009-10 season with Clifford Odets’ Tony Award-winning dramatic yet funny tale of a Jewish family in the Bronx weathering the Depression.
2 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m. $15–$55. Aurora Theatre, 2801 Addison St., Berkeley, (510) 843-4822, www.auroratheatre.org.

Aug 22-23  •  Chinatown StreetFest. Celebrate the year of the Ox and Asian traditions—Chinese lion dances, Japanese taiko drumming and Tahitian dance among them—in Oakland Chinatown at this free 22nd annual event that covers nearly 10 blocks, includes three stages and hundreds of food booths.
10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.oaklandchinatownstreetfest.com.
FREE

Aug 28–30  •  Eat Real Fest. A new foodie event from the Slow Food Nation folks debuts in Oakland to emphasize “good food is fun, that healthy means delicious, that farmers are your friends and that fast is not the end of food! Putting the food back in fast, Eat Real Festival inspires eaters to choose tasty, healthy, good food.”
Details were unavailable at press time, so for more info, visit www.eatrealfest.com.

Aug 26  •  Summer Sounds. The dance band The Love Machine gets people cutting the rug outdoors, as part of Oakland City Center’s Summer Sounds series.
Noon–1 p.m. 13th Street and Broadway, (510) 628-8490, www.oaklandcitycenter.com.
FREE

Aug 27  •  Alameda Museum Lecture Series. Architectural historian Betty Marvin speaks on “Just Across the Pond: Oakland Point and the West Oakland Marsh.”
7 p.m. Free for museum members, $5 others. Alameda Museum, 2324 Alameda Ave., Alameda, (510) 748.0796, www.alamedamuseum.org.
 

ONGOING

This list expands and contracts as space permits.

Art/Galleries/Museums

Oakland Museum of California. The museum’s Web site describes itself as “the only museum devoted to the art, history and natural sciences in California.” Currently it is undergoing renovations, with Phase 1 due for completion next year. The art and history galleries are closed, but there’s still lots going on, particularly on with the First Fridays After Five Series.
10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wed.–Sat., noon–5 p.m. Sun., 10 a.m.–9 p.m. first Fridays; $8 adults, $5 seniors and students, children under 6 free. 1000 Oak St., (510) 238-2200, www.museumca.org.

Oakland Walking Tours.
Take a free 90-minute walking tour of downtown Oakland. Eight routes offered. Tours are Wednesdays and Saturdays. 10 a.m. Reservations recommended; fee-based custom tours also available.
(510) 238-3234, e-mail aallen@oaklandnet.com, www.oaklandnet.com/government/cmo/walkingtours/default.html.

USS Potomac.
Nautical nuts can soak in history by touring or cruising on the “Floating White House,” FDR’s presidential yacht and a National Historic Landmark with something of a checkered past. Prices vary. Docent-led dockside tours Wednesday, Fridays and Sundays; frequent special events; chartering available. Docks at Oakland’s Jack London Square.
540 Water St., (510) 627-1215, www.usspotomac.org.

Alameda Naval Air Museum.
Climb into a cockpit, inspect the ammo, hear some stories from the volunteers who staff the place and generally step back in time.
Open 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. 2151 Ferry Point, No. 77, Alameda, (510) 522-4262, www.alamedanavalairmuseum.com.

Oakland Art Murmur. The Art Murmur is a group of downtown galleries that have openings every first Friday of each month. There also are performances on 23rd Street, sidewalk display tables and a very hip crowd.
7 p.m.–9 p.m. Check with the individual galleries to make sure your favorite gallery is open. The list is at www.oaklandartmurmur.com.

Estuary Art Attack.
Explore the “bohemian, multicultural and esoteric arts” of Alameda and Oakland’s Jingletown on the second Friday of every month with galleries and some participating restaurants promising new exhibits each time.
6 p.m.–9 p.m. Visit www.estuaryartattack.com or www.autobodyfineart.com for more details.

Mercury 20 Gallery.
Twenty artists comprise this gallery and studio cooperative in Uptown. First Friday receptions, 6 p.m.–9 p.m. Regular hours
4 p.m.–7 p.m. Fri., 12 p.m.–3 p.m. Sat. Free. 25 Grand Ave., Oakland, (510) 701-4620, www.mercurytwenty.com.

Lucky Ju Ju Pinball.
Among the more unusual gallery spaces, Lucky Ju Ju is a place where Magic, Karma, Zeitgeist and Skill are infused into a collection of vintage pinball machines. Rotating exhibits, too.
Open 6 p.m.–midnight Fri. and Sat. and 4 p.m.–8 p.m. Sun. 713 Santa Clara Ave., Alameda, (510) 205-9793, www.ujuju.com.

Swarm Studios + Gallery. A well-lighted, big space in the Jack London Square nabe.
Web site is swarmstudios.wordpress.com. 560 Second St., Oakland, (510) 839-2787, www.swarmgallery.com.

Rhythmix Cultural Works.
A fantastic addition to the Alameda/East Bay art scene, with a fine gallery anchoring a vibrant education program.
2513 Blanding Ave., Alameda, (510) 865-5060. www.rhythmix.org.

Frank Bette Center for the Arts.
Self-described on its Web site as “a place for meetings, readings, showing and other creative doings,” and there is almost always something going on.
1601 Paru St., Alameda, (510) 523-6957, www.frankbettecenter.org.
 

Sports

Oakland Athletics. Watch the local nine wend their way through the season. Game times and prices vary.
Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, (510) 569-2121, www.oaklandathletics.com.

Music/Performance

The Paramount Theatre. A true jewel in audacious art deco style, the Paramount presents many performances of all stripes, plus it’s home to the Oakland East Bay Symphony and a series of movie classics. Tours on the first and third Saturdays of each month at 10 a.m. (Reservations required). Private tours available, too.
2025 Broadway, Oakland, (510)-893-2300, www.paramounttheatre.com.

The Uptown Club. The Uptown Club. Indie rock, garage, punk, experimental, pop, folk, rockabilly music—you can probably hear some iteration of it here at Uptown’s eponymous destination live music club. Cover, times vary.
1928 Telegraph Ave., Oakland, (510) 451-8100, www.uptownnightclub.com.

Yoshi’s Jazz Club. Oakland’s premier sushi restaurant earned much of its world-class reputation less from its Japanese cuisine (which is now top-flight) than its always-stellar jazz (and then some) lineup.
510 Embarcadero West, (510) 238-9200, www.yoshis.com.

Julie’s Coffee & Tea Garden.
This small, intimate venue routinely invites musicians, artists, speakers and authors, bringing a touch of creativity to Alameda.
1223 Park St., Alameda, (510) 865-2385, www.juliestea.com.

Crosstown Community Center. This casual, coffeehouse-like community center hosts everything from book readings and board game nights to musical performances and educational programs.
1303 High St., Alameda, (510) 864-8600.

Families

Alameda Point Antiques and Collectibles Faire. This vintage antique fair is one the biggest outdoor antique fairs in the Bay Area and happens every first Sunday of the month at Alameda Point at the former Alameda Naval Air station.
$5–$15. (510) 522-7500, www.antiquesbythebay.net.

Chabot Space & Science Center. This institution has served San Francisco Bay Area schools and citizens with astronomy and science education programs for more than 125 years. The center began in 1883 as the Oakland Observatory, through a gift from Anthony Chabot to the city of Oakland.
Closed Mon. and Tue.; 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wed. and Thu.; 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Fri. and Sat.; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. Free telescope viewing Fri. and Sat., dusk to 10:30 p.m. 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland, (510) 336-7300, www.chabotspace.org.

Children’s Fairyland. Grab the kids and some sun block and head to historic Children’s Fairyland for 10 acres of storybook fun all summer long. Check the Web site for information about special performances and the puppet and children’s theaters.
The park is open 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Wed.–Sun. (weather permitting). $6 per person. 699 Bellevue Ave., Oakland, (510) 452-2259, www.fairyland.org.

 

 

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